The many definitions of Transitional

The term transitional is used a variety of ways within the Cabbage Patch collecting community. It can be very confusing. Here’s an [attempted] explanation.

The term transitional has a variety of meanings in the Cabbie Collecting Community. It can get incredibly confusing. I’m going to try and explain.

Merriam-Webster Dictionary Online

Cabbage Patch Collector Definitions

Time Period Definition

The term refers to the change from Coleco, as the manufacturing company, to Hasbro. This change occurred in steps, as displayed by the tags used on CPK products of the time, so it took a while. The period typically referred to as ‘transitional’ is from 1989 to 1990. Some collectors will also include late 1998 (see clothing definition below).

Oddly enough, although there have been many similar transitions as CPK manufacturing moved from company to company (see the list here) over the last 40 years, none of the others are referred to in the same fashion. When we use the term transitional as a label, it’s always the FIRST transition from Coleco to Hasbro.

Doll Definition

As I mentioned, the tags on their products of this time displayed the steps taken during the move from Coleco to Hasbro, and this included the dolls.

When referring to a ‘transitional doll’, a collector can be referring to any doll produced between 1989 and 1990. That means they have a light pink (rose-coloured) signature (Coleco 1989), or they have a mauve signature (Hasbro 1990). To see all the signatures visit HERE.

However, a doll can have more than one label, and those labels typically take precedence when describing the doll. For example, Designer Line Kids came out during the Transitional Period, but we don’t generally call them ‘Transitional Designer Line Kids’. We call them Designer Line kids. The transitional label is left off. The same can be said for Growing Hair Kids (1988-89) and Poseable Kids (1989 – 1990).

On the other hand, regular kids produced during that period DO get labelled with the word. We call them ‘Transitional Toddlers’, ‘Transitional BBBs’, ‘Transitional Preemies’, and ‘Transitional kids’ (referring to regular 16” kids). Some of these kids are hybrids. They have a body made by one company and a head made by the other. DL kids and GH kids are never hybrids.

If the doll isn’t from a specific line being produced at the time (i.e. Designer Line), then it can come in a variety of clothing. The clothes may have been produced BEFORE the transitional period, during the transitional period, or it might have Hasbro clothing produced after 1989. Hasbro and Coleco spent a few years putting together very odd combinations to get rid of old stock.

Clothing Definition

The clothing tags have the same issues as the doll tags. In fact, they can be even more confusing. I’ve provided an explanation of the changes over time in the post Transitional Period CPK Outfits – A Summary. I suggest you read it first, then come back to this post. Sorry! I wrote this in the wrong order.

Anyway, like the dolls, the clothing from specific lines is described using those names first. So, Designer Line outfits and Growing Hair Kid outfits are called ‘Designer Line’ ‘ and ‘Growing Hair’, not transitional. However, to add to the confusion, Poseable kid outfits ARE called transitional. This is because most of these outfits were produced by Hasbro and were also sold on regular kids. They weren’t specific to the Poseable Kid line.

As noted in the post I suggested you read earlier, transitional clothing doesn’t follow the numbering schema used for most of Coleco’s production. These clothes are in the 100s and often have a 9- in front of the number/code.

White clothing tag from cabbage patch outfit 145A, factory P, made in 1989.

Now, there’s one group of clothes that are VERY confusing. Those are the regular kid clothes that started being sold in 1988 (800s Series) and then continued being put on kids and sold well into 1989. Although these clothes aren’t technically transitional, as they were made in 1988, they often came on transitional dolls. So, there’s some debate as to whether they can also be considered transitional.

It doesn’t help that some of these outfits were changed slightly by Hasbro and then given the same number as their original Coleco counterpart. These outfits are technically transitional but still have a 1988 production code! They do use a Hasbro tag though, so that makes it somewhat easier. These outfits are #808, #809, #812, and #815, all of which are described HERE.

The 800s series regular outfits are also easily confused with outfits produced in 1989 because they look very similar. For example, the 800s look quite a bit like Designer Line outfits. The individual pieces can be easily confused between them.

Some of the other packaged outfits produced in 1989 (Future Post) also look quite a bit like 800s series outfits. This just adds to the overall confusion.

Fun Links

1989 Coleco Catalogue
Hasbro 1990 Catalogue

Growing Hair Kid Outfits

Their hair is a surprise, and so are their outfits! Find out what outfit your Growing Hair Kid may have worn and the special hair accessories that came with it.

Growing Hair Kids [GHK] came out in 1988. They are dolls whose cornsilk hair can be pulled out to varying lengths. They came in their unique box with a special GHK birth certificate and hand tag. They also came with a brush, a bag of wider hair ribbons, and styling guide instructions.

All these dolls were girls that came in a variety of hair/eye colour combinations. A few came with freckles, and there were AA kids produced. They used several regular head moulds, but HM 22 and HM 23 were only used for Growing Hair Kids.

Refer to my Head Mold Reference Page for pictures of these unique head molds.

For more detailed information on GHK, visit Ref #3, p. 88-89, or Ref #2, p.165

Growing Hair Kids Outfits

There are two very different parts to the GHK series of outfits. Group 1 was made by the P factory, and Group 2 by the KT factory.

The P factory outfits were worn ONLY by Growing Hair Kids. The KT factory outfits are, numerically, part of another series, but some of them were worn by only GHK’s, while others were worn by GHK’s and regular 1988 kids.  Consequently, the KT outfits are dramatically different from the P factory outfits. I’m unsure which came out first, or why regular 1988 outfits were used on Growing Hair Kid dolls.

Each GHK outfit came with one of four hair accessories.

  • 1) (Circular Dec.) Ribbon bow with lacy/satin ribbon circular decoration
  • 2) (Lacy Bow) Ribbon bow with larger lacy bow accent
  • 3) (Puffy Bow) Large puffy fabric bow
  • 4) (Suede Bow) Suede fabric bow

Overview of P Factory Outfits

There are six outfits in this series, #842 – #847. There appear to be five or six versions of each outfit, A – F. They are all similar in style.

Each outfit came with silk undies. I’ve seen them in pink, yellow, white, and purple. Growing Hair Kids came wearing matching coloured Mary Jane shoes and lacy ruffled socks.

Outfit #842- Ruffle neck dress with wide waist ribbon

Outfit 843 -Low waisted dress with front ruffles

Outfit 844 – Dres with large vertical ruffle

Outfit 845 – Dress with four folds and Peter Pan collar

Outfit 846 – Dress with square collar and large hem

Outfit 847 – Drop waist with lace down the front

Overview of KT Factory Outfits

These four outfits, 808, 809, 811, and 814, although part of the 804-815 series, were worn by GHK dolls. In fact, in a few cases, they appear to have come ONLY on GHK. However, I could be missing information. There could be more outfits from this series that came on GHK, and those that appear to only come on GHK may have come on the regular kids.

These outfits are very different in style and fabrics from the P factory outfits.  I have no idea what came under them. Most of them came with Ballet Flats.

When these outfits came on Growing Hair Kids, the outfit came with a hair accessory.

  • 808 – suede fabric tie
  • 809 – hair accessory unknown
  • 811 – puffy hair bow
  • 814 –suede fabric tie

For more information on these outfits, including the record spreadsheet, refer to the following posts: All about outfits #804-#809 and All about outfits #810 – #815

Similar Outfits

These dresses all have drop waists, all-over prints, and a large waist ribbon or bow.

Other Information

These 1988 Coleco Catalogue advert pictures have the kids wearing later Cornsilk dresses and a few of the GHK dresses. Interestingly, they didn’t end up wearing the Cornsilk dresses, but they did come in ‘regular’ kid outfits.

All about outfits #810 – #815

Cat patterns, neckerchiefs, tracksuits and suspenders. All a part of this quirky 1988/9 series.

Summary information about the 800s series: 800’s Regular Kid Outfits, Pt. 1
All about outfits #804 – #809

I believe that most of these outfits came in about six versions, but some came with more and some with less. Most use letters A – F (ish), except the three later Coleco outfits that only came on Growing Hair Kids, which use the letters F, G, H.

NOTE ABOUT SHOES: The shoes noted as coming with each outfit are those I have the most evidence for. However, Coleco has been known to throw anything on a kid (for whatever reason), and during this time, they were trying to get rid of stock, so anything is possible. So, in a way, this is only a guideline.

#810 HASBRO – Sweater top and shorts

Outfit: It has a shirt made of sweater material with a large heat transfer patch on the front and brightly coloured and patterned shorts.

Shoes: Striped sneakers

Other Information
This outfit only came on boys and, because it’s a Hasbro outfit, likely wasn’t sold until 1989.

Similar Outfits

  • The shirt in #182 looks very similar. Some may even be the same shirt with different tags inside. This does make some sense, as they were being manufactured around the same time.
Outfit 182E, P factory: Black bomber jacket over a sweater with large heat transfer on the chest and red pants.
Photo courtesy of Vanessa Brisson.
  • The top from the Hasbro boy’s poseable kid tracksuit is very similar to the top in this outfit.
Hasbro poseable tracksuit with green trim and main colours of pink, blue and black and white checker.
  • The Hasbro shirt and shorts outfit is very similar; however, upon closer inspection the patterns and the fabric are different.
T-shirt and shorts outfit for Hasbro poseable kid. Top is red with black and white striped sleeves. The shorts are purple with yellow and striped leg.

#811 – Drop waist dress and blouse

Outfit: This is a drop waist dress with ties at the shoulders and a waffle fabric belt. There’s a blouse underneath, and it comes with a matching large puffy hair bow.

Shoes: Ballet Flats?

Other Information
* This outfit is very rare. I believe it only came on Growing Hair Kids in the first half of 1989. I haven’t seen it on a regular 1988 kid yet. This is very strange as it’s a Coleco outfit. However, it uses the letters F, G, and H, and so may be later additions to the series. This may explain why this outfit, and the others like it, didn’t show up until 1989.
* Growing Hair Kid hair accessory is a puffy bow.

#812 COLECO – Tuxedo cat sweat set with shirt

Outfit: This outfit has a sweater material top with a tuxedo style back, key-hole neck cut out, and collar which goes over a shirt with coloured trim. There are matching sweatpants.

Shoes: Saddle shoes (Ref #4, Dec 1988, Vol. 3 Issue 4, p. 1)

Spreadsheet showing which versions of this outfit I have recorded, and which I do not.

Other Information
* This outfit only came on girls.
* Because of the cat design, it is generally very sought after.

Similar Outfit

Outfit #157 looks a little like this outfit if you don’t have the hoodie portion.

Outfit 157A with a sleeveless hoodie, and tracksuit. The main colours are blue, red and yellow.
Photo courtesy of Jodi Issacs.

#812 HASBRO – Tuxedo sweat set with shirt

Outfit: Sweater material top with tuxedo style back, collar, and heat-transfer patch on the chest. There are matching sweatpants.

Shoes: Chunky sneakers

Spreadsheet showing which versions of this outfit I have recorded, and which I do not.

Other Information

This outfit only came on girls and, because it’s a Hasbro outfit, likely wasn’t sold until 1989.

Similar Outfits

It looks like#321, a cornsilk tracksuit outfit, except this outfit has no tuxedo back on the shirt.

Outfit 321B - Purple tracksuit with the letters CPK in a pattern on the shirt.

Hasbro boy’s poseable kid tracksuit, although this one is a lot more colourful.

Hasbro poseable tracksuit with green trim and main colours of pink, blue and black and white checker.

#814 – Dress, blouse and neckerchief

Outfit: This is a suede fabric dress with three buttons on the front and two pockets on the skirt. There’s a button-up blouse underneath, and it comes with a neckerchief.

Shoes: Ballet Flats

Other Information
* This is one of the hardest-to-find outfits in this series, especially with all the parts.
* I have no idea what came under this outfit.
* This outfit is very rare. I believe it only came on Growing Hair Kids in the first half of 1989. I haven’t seen it on a regular 1988 kid yet. This is very strange as it’s a Coleco outfit. However, it uses the letters F, G, and H, and so may be later additions to the series. This may explain why this outfit, and the others like it, didn’t show up until 1989.
* Growing Hair Kid hair accessory unknown. I’m not even sure it came with one.

#815 COLECO – Shirt with suspender pants

Outfit: Pants with attached suspenders, elastic waist and three buttons down the front. A collared shirt with three buttons goes underneath.

Shoes: Ballet Flats

Other Information

This outfit only came on girls.

Similar Outfits

Outfit #180 looks similar if you don’t have the jacket; however, the pattern is on the overalls, not the shirt.

Outfit 180B: Red jacket with crazy pattern and matching overalls and a yellow shirt with red trim.

#815 Hasbro – Shirt with suspender pants

Outfit: Pants with attached suspenders, elastic waist and three buttons down the front. It has a heat-transfer patch on the legs.  A collared shirt with three buttons and coloured trim goes underneath.

Shoes: Striped sneakers

Other Information

This outfit only came on girls, and because it’s a Hasbro outfit, likely wasn’t sold until 1989.

Similar Outfits

Outfit #180 looks similar if you don’t have the jacket; however, the pattern is on the overalls, not the shirt.

Outfit 180B: Red jacket with crazy pattern and matching overalls and a yellow shirt with red trim.

All about outfits #804-#809

Dinosaur overalls, various overalls, suspenders, and safari looks. Find them all in this first half of the series.

Summary information about the 800s series: 800’s Regular Kid Outfits, Pt. 1
All about outfits #810 – #815

I believe that most of these outfits came in about six versions, but some came with more and some with less. Most use letters A – F (ish), except the three later Coleco outfits that only came on Growing Hair Kids, which use the letters F, G, H.

NOTE ABOUT SHOES: The shoes noted as coming with each outfit are those I have the most evidence for. However, Coleco has been known to throw anything on a kid (for whatever reason), and during this time, they were trying to get rid of stock, so anything is possible. So, in a way, this is only a guideline.

#804 – Safari Outfit

Outfit: Top and pants
Shoes: Striped Sneakers

Other Information
* There are two different shirt patterns, each matched with three pairs of pants. Therefore, I think there are six outfits in total.
* This outfit only came on boys.

#805 – Unidentified

#806 – Top and Shorts with tie

Outfit: Button-up top and shorts that have a material belt
Shoes: Ballet Flats

Other Information
* This outfit only came on girls.

#807 – Dino Overalls

Outfit: White t-shirt with coloured trim and overalls.
Shoes: Striped Sneakers

Other Information
* This is the most frequently copied of the outfits in this series. This outfit is VERY popular.
* This outfit only came on girls.

Similar Outfits

There are many similar outfits, in that they are all overalls with a shirt underneath. However, they are generally not confused with this outfit as the pattern on these overalls is VERY distinctive. The following are the only exceptions.

#143 is a transitional period packaged outfit with a cameo pattern. Sometimes this is considered part of this series, as it came out about the same time. It is not.

Outfit #143: Packaged CPK outfit. It's purple and white cameo pattern overalls with a white t-shirt with purple trim.

Some versions of #875, a toddler overall style outfit, also came in a dinosaur-patterned fabric.

Outfit 875: Pink and white stripedruffled toped overalls with a white blouse underneath. The overalls have yellow and blue dinosaurs on them.
Photos courtesy of Sarah Bensette-Renaud.

#808 COLECO – Romper with tie and Shirt

Outfit: Collared button-up shirt with a full-length romper that ties at the shoulders and which has a matching fabric belt. There is one pocket on the romper and no patches.
Shoes: Ballet Flats; maybe Kissing Kid shoes?

Other Information
* There’s some evidence that a few of these outfits came with Hasbro Kissing Kid shoes, which would be very odd.
* This outfit came on some Growing Hair Kids in the first half of 1989.
* This outfit only came on girls.

#808 HASBRO – Romper with tie and Shirt

Outfit: Collared button-up shirt under a full-length romper which ties at the shoulders and has a fabric belt. There is one pocket on the romper, and there is at least one heat transfer patch on the shirt or the romper. Some have more than one patch.
Shoes: Striped sneakers

Other Information
* This outfit only came on girls.

#809 COLECO – Pants with suspenders & shirt

Outfit: Pants with a small bib and suspenders consisting of pleather pieces and plastic buckle and loop. The collared shirt has a pastel stained-glass pattern to it.
Shoes: Unknown

Other Information
* This outfit is very rare. I believe it only came on Growing Hair Kids in the first half of 1989. I haven’t seen it on a regular 1988 kid yet. This is very strange as it’s a Coleco outfit. However, it uses the letters F, G, and H, and so maybe later additions to the series. This may explain why this outfit, and the others like it, didn’t show up until 1989.
* Growing Hair Kid hair accessory unknown.
* This outfit is aesthetically and materially different from the other outfits in this series.

#809 HASBRO – Pants with suspenders and shirt

Outfit: Pants with a small bib and attached suspenders. It also has a patch on the bib. Under is a collared shirt with no buttons.
Shoes: Unknown, maybe Saddle Shoes

Other Information
* Unlike other Coleco/Hasbro pairings in this series, the two #809 outfits look markedly different.

Similar Outfits

#180 looks similar if you don’t have the jacket. Hasbro poseable kid’s girl coveralls and general overalls.

Continue to : Outfits #810 – #815

800’s Regular Kid Outfits – Summary

Dino overalls, safari outfits, and confusion are all part of this 1988 series. Finally straighten out the confusion between these outfits, Designer Line and other outfits.

All About Outfits #804 – #809
All about Outfits #810 – #815

There are 14 outfits in this series, #804 – #815, as well as two missing outfits, #805 and #813. All of the outfits were made by the KT factory or by Hasbro. Most of them likely came on KT kids. I am unsure if these outfits came with underwear, diapers, or panties. Do you know? Finally, they came with a variety of shoes depending on the outfit, including striped sneakers, ballet flats, saddle shoes, and chunky sneakers.

Photos courtesy of Chris Hansing Tallman, Jodi Issacs, Dani, Melissa Crick Gore, Kat Pershouse, and Jennifer Runnoe.

Most of the outfits in this series came out in 1988 on regular yarn-haired kids, but they can also be found on 1989 dolls. Consequently, they are often confused with Designer Line and Hasbro Poseable Kid outfits. They are also often described as transitional and some are, but many are not. (To learn about what I consider transitional, visit The Many Definitions of Transitional) To add to the confusion, some of these outfits also came on 1989 Growing Hair Kids, but Growing Hair outfits didn’t come on regular kids, and a few of the outfits in this series may have only come out in 1989. Those outfits could technically be considered transitional.

Photos from Coleco 1989 Catalogue, 1989 p. 7 & 9 and Hasbro 1990 Catalogue, p 2.

Confused yet? There’s more!

For an outline of the Coleco to Hasbro timeline, visit Transitional Period CPK Outfits – A Summary

Some of these outfits have both a Coleco and a Hasbro version, for example, #808, and some outfits were only produced by Hasbro, for example, #810. Based on an article from the Dec. 1988 Dolling Around Newsletter, it seems likely that the Hasbro outfits didn’t come out until 1989. So, I guess they are transitional. The article provides a list of the new 1988 outfits, and none of the Hasbro outfits are on the list. In addition, the VHTF Coleco outfits are missing, as I believe they would have thought them to be Growing Hair kid outfits (Ref #4, Dec. 1988, Vol 3, Iss. 1)

Some photos courtesy of Jodi Issacs.

As I said, some of these outfits also came on Growing Hair (GH) kids. When they did, they also came with a matching hair accessory. The outfits I have confirmed as coming on GH kids are #808, #809, #811, and #814.

Photos courtesy of Chris Hansing Tallman, Melissa Crick Gore, and Jennifer Runnoe.

Packaged? Nope

I have no evidence that these outfits ever came packaged. However, being so near the end of Coleco’s run, there may be package lots out there with individual pieces or entire outfits. Not being sold as packaged outfits and having been made for such a short period would also explain why the outfits in this series are generally harder to find.

Popular and Hard-to-find

Outfits #807 and #812 are the most sought-after outfits in this series, with #807 being copied frequently. One collector has gone so far as to hand copy the pattern of the fabric and recreate it so she could make exact replicas. They’re amazing! As for #812, cats.

 #805 would be the hardest to find if it exists, but at the moment, I believe that #814 and #809 (Coleco version) hold this title. Given Coleco’s previous history, there’s a good chance #813 was never produced.

There are many additional unusual aspects to these outfits. To find out more about each specific outfit, visit:
All About Outfits #804 – #809
All about Outfits #810 – #815 (Future Post)

A Match Made in . . . the Factory (Matching Pt. 1)

How do you know if an outfit originally came with the doll? Here’s the first step to finding out!

There is no way to know what outfit originally came on a doll. The choices were made randomly. However, you can match the production year of the doll to the production year of the outfits, and in some cases, the factory information.

1983 – 1985ish: A Match!

Coleco dolls produced from 1983 to 1984 (and some stuff in 1985) generally came with clothing made at the same factory. So, if the doll was OK factory, the outfit and shoes were also OK factory.


            KT Boy                      OK Girl

Dolls wearing 500s outfits which came out in 1985 also matched factories.

The 500 series outfits on dolls, sitting on stairs, to display the outfits.

However, I know of at least one collector who admits to taking kids out and switching clothes AT THE STORE, so even if you bought a kid from the store and it didn’t match, that doesn’t mean it didn’t originally come with the correct outfit!

Series Specific Pairs . . .

Some lines of kids had specific clothing created just for them. In many of these cases, the dolls and the outfits always match. There may be two factories producing them, but there is always a match.

Talking KidsOK 
Circus KidsP, KT 
World Travelers
WT White shirts
OK, PMI
CC, SS
Designer LineP 
1st Cornsilk Series (160s)OK, KT 
300s Cornsilk SeriesOK, KT, P
Baby outfits (BBB)SS, WS Exceptions: #1, #2
PJ Series (689-694)KT 
720s series Cornsilk and
regular kid outfits
KT
760s Cornsilk seriesP
Growing Hair KidsP, KT 
ToddlersOK 
KoosasOK, KT 

Continued in: Part 2: A Perfect Mismatch!