Hong Kong Jesmar Shoes

These shoes came on Hong Kong Jesmars and Early Tag Jesmars. If they’re spanish, why do they say Hong Kong?

The majority of this information is courtesy of Jennifer Pelfrey via various Facebook messenger conversations. In some cases, I have just quoted her! Thank you, Jennifer! Additionally, kudos to Marta Aleman Perez, Callie Anne, Charlotte Ridgers, and Severine Guiguet for their contributions as well.

For more general information on Jesmar dolls and closing visit Jesmars and J Clothing.

‘Hong Kong’ Jesmar Kids

These dolls were likely those produced within the first few weeks or months of production. See below for theories about the origins of the HK aspects. Remember, Jesmar dolls were likely manufactured for less than two years.

Characteristics

  • They have a neck-stamp that says Hong Kong. There are at least two different stamps; there may be more.

    (Photos courtesy of Jennifer Pelfrey.)
  • They came with either no body tag or with the Early Jesmar body tag.

    There’s speculation that dolls without tags are the earliest sample Jesmar dolls. “I suspect Jesmar may not have had tags made at that point as they were still in the sample-making phase.” (Jennifer Pelfrey, FB, May 16, 2021)
  • HK Jesmars share many of the same qualities as Early Jesmars, such as glossy eye paint, softer heads, neck connection is a string, a dark signature, etc.  They may also have unusual hair colours or hair/eye combination which were not mass-produced later. i.e., soft orange vs. the later regular red.
     [insert picture of hair comparison]
  • They may only have had six freckles. How many does your HK Jesmar have? (Charlotte Ridgers, FB, May 18, 2021) For more information on Jesmar freckle patterns refer to Ref #3, p. 199 – 200)

‘Early’ Jesmar Shoes

These shoes look and feel quite a bit like Hong Kong shoes. They are characterized by:

  • the tongue has not been cut out; the shoe is one full piece
  • soft, pliable vinyl
  • rough/bumpy textured bottoms
  • badly formed interiors (appears ‘runny’)
  • thicker laces (though some came with standard laces).  [insert picture comparison]
  • a lack of markings on the inside

These shoes are not found exclusively on HK Jesmars. They have also been found on kids with early tags and Made in Spain neck stamps. “Personally, I’ve found them most often on Early Tag/Made in Spain kids with odd hair colors, but they were sometimes used on Early Tag kids with standard hair colors as well.” (Jennifer Pelfrey, FB May 17, 2021)

“There has been some debate over whether these shoes are actually Jesmar made, or whether they were made in Hong Kong and supplied to Jesmar when they were starting out. There are obvious similarities between these shoes and those that we know were manufactured in Hong Kong.  So, depending on who you ask, some will say that these are Hong Kong shoes while others will say Jesmar.  Until formal documentation surfaces we may never know.” (Jennifer Pelfrey, FB, May 14, 2021)

NOTE: Shoes that say ” Made in Hong Kong” on the bottom are also theorized to be Jesmar shoes, but others think they’re aftermarket. For more information on these shoes, visit These aren’t CPK shoes?!

Why do they say HK? Some Theories

One collector called the Hong Kong Jesmars a hypothesis. She described them as series of tests so that the Jesmar Co. could figure out what they were going to produce. (FB Conversation, May 17, 2021) Here are some theories as to why their heads are stamped Hong Kong and why the shoes have Hong Kong like qualities.

1)  There were unused shoes that had been manufactured in Hong Kong laying around, so Coleco gave them to Jesmar to use until Jesmar could manufacture shoes of their own.

2) “Supposedly, HK moulds were loaned to Jesmar so that they could make sample heads. The samples then went through a review process with Coleco and OAA.” (Jennifer Pelfrey, FB, May 15, 2021) It is supposed that once Jesmar was approved for mass production, shoe moulds and Made in Spain embossed head moulds were provided to Jesmar for ongoing production.

For more general information on Jesmar dolls and closing visit Jesmars and J Clothing and Ref #3, p. 198 – 231.

Shoes: Jesmar Shoes

What shoes did the Jesmar factory produce and how can you identify them?

Disclaimer: My research into Jesmar clothing is only an addendum to my research into Coleco clothing. As such, I do not have access to a significant amount of information. This is a compilation of what I know about Jesmar shoes, based on the resources to which I have access. Shoes produced by the other foreign factories are not covered here as I have even less access to them, and I cannot provide sufficient information for identification.

For information on Jesmar dolls and clothing, visit Jesmar Tags and Clothing.

Jesmar produced their own versions of all four types of original Coleco footwear: lace-ups, Mary Janes, sneakers, and knit booties. However, there are distinctive characteristics that allow Jesmar shoes to be differentiated from Coleco shoes.

For information on Coleco shoes, visit Shoes: Overview and Summary Links.

Identification Marks

Unlike Coleco shoes, Jesmar shoes do not have a factory or location identifier. However, they do have other marks that make them identifiable.

Mark 1 – The Funky Shape

This mark is often found in the heel of many Jesmar shoes. There are no factory or location identifiers.

View of the inside heel of a Jesmar Cabbage patch shoe. You can see a T shaped line inside the shoes heel, along with the number 2.

Mark 2 – Left over molded vinyl bits

Sometimes in the heel, you can see small circles of left-over vinyl that appear to be an error in the mould.

View of the inside heel of a Cabbage Patch shoe. You can see two small circles of extra vinyl material.

Mark 3 – Different Pattern

Some Jesmar lace-up shoes have a different sort of pattern on the front. Instead of the flower shape, it’s a diamond. Therefore, Jemsar shoes can have both patterns.

Comparison between regular lace-up shoes that have different fonts sections.

‘Hong Kong’ Jesmar Shoes – visit HERE

NOTE: Shoes that say ” Made in Hong Kong” on the bottom are also theorized to be Jesmar shoes, but others think they’re aftermarket. For more information on these shoes, visit These aren’t CPK shoes?!

Regular Lace-up’s

Version 1: These shoes have a VERY prominent edge around the sole of the shoe; it’s almost square. The vinyl tends to be very malleable, and they have extremely prominent embossed stitching. They have the flower shape on the front (Mark 3). Inside, in the heel, they often have the extra mould material (Mark 2 above).

Version 2: These shoes are made of much harder, smoother, almost glossy vinyl. They have absolutely no lip or edge at the sole, and the pattern is debossed. They have a diamond shape on the front (Mark 3). Inside, in the heel, they often have Mark 1 from above.

Comparison – Coleco vs. Version 2 vs. Version 1

Comparison picture of a Coleco lace-up shoe and each of the version of the Jesmar lace-up shoe.

There are some excellent aftermarket replicas that look a lot like Jesmar lace-ups. For details, visit These aren’t CPK shoes?!

Mary Janes

Jesmar Mary Jane shoes are generally very smooth with almost glossy vinyl. The front section is pointier than regular Coleco shoes. Although there is no edge/rim at the sole, if they have not been trimmed well, there can be a sort of edge created by extra vinyl material.

Comparison – Coleco vs. Jesmar

Comparison picture of a Coleco Mary Jane shoe and a Jesmar Mary Jane shoe.

Sneakers

There appear to be two different versions of the sneakers, again a difference in the malleability of the vinyl. However, the pattern and shape do not appear to be distinctly different.

Jesmar sneakers have a slightly different shape then Coleco, and it is very well defined. They are also pointier than Coleco shoes.

Jesmar produced white, blue, and pink striped sneakers. Some pink stripes can fade over time into a peach colour. (Facebook Conversation; April 7, 2021)

Comparison – Coleco vs. Jesmar

Comparison picture of a Coleco sneaker and a Jesmar sneaker. They are both white.

Knit Booties

Jesmar only produced knit booties for their version of the #9 Bubble Romper outfit.

Jesmar version of of the #9 Bubble Romper outfit. The romper is blue and white gingham and the sweater and booties are white knit.
Photo courtesy of Jenna Young.

Like Coleco booties, Jesmar booties have a distinctive knit pattern that matches the pattern in the sweater.

A pair of knit, white, Jesmar booties for #9 bubble romper outfit.
Photo courtesy of Heather Day.

Jesmar Socks

Jesmar socks are very different from Coleco socks. They have no cuff and are made of nylon/pantyhose type of material.

Comparison picture of a Coleco sock beside a Jesmar sock.
Coleco vs. Jesmar socks

Fun Fact

Jesmar continued to produce these shoes and use them on other dolls through 1986 and 1987. (FB Conversation, Jennifer Pelfrey, Aug. 2021) Note that the socks also appear to be the same.

Picture of a Jesmar Burbijitas doll that is shown with what are considered Jesmar socks and shoes.

Shoes: Mary Janes

Mary Jane shoes came with some of the most beautiful dresses. Which did they come with and what shoes go with what?

Shoes: An overview and reference links

Mary Jane shoes were manufactured by Coleco throughout the entirety of their production. However, the characteristics of the shoes varied by factory and over time.

Hong Kong Shoes

Click for a definition of Hong Kong Kids.

In the beginning, when production took place in Hong Kong [HK], the shoes had a very distinctive look. In general, they have a number of these features but do not need to have them all.

  • They have a thicker feel to the vinyl. In some cases, the vinyl did not mould well and may have a runny look on the inside.
  • Not all have HK shoes have black text in the heel, but if it is black, it’s likely an HK shoe.
  • They tend to look less ‘finished’ than other shoes. The edges look more like they’ve been cut out, or the vinyl around the edges has been trimmed.
  • HK shoes are more likely to get pox than later shoes.
A picture of three different white Mary Jane shoes for comparison. HK P, HK OK, and a later regular shoe.
HK P vs HK OK vs. later regular shoe
OK  Some have black text. I have found some made with a very hard, almost grey vinyl. Some are very narrow and long. 
PThe text runs vertically, not horizontally, in the heel. I have not found any P with black text. The vinyl is very malleable. 
KTUnable to comment. I don’t have any in my collection.  

Post HK Shoes – 1986ish shoes

After the ‘experimental’ Hong Kong period, the shoes became more uniform but still had many characteristics that varied by factory. It can be very difficult to ‘match’ shoes. You THINK they look like they should match, but when you put them side by side, they are nothing alike! They aren’t the same shape, colour, texture, etc.

Most of the shoes have the factory indicator and the words HONG KONG stamped on the inside by the heel, on the bottom. The factory indicator can be inside a circle or not.

After production moved to China, the shoes became more uniform in appearance but continued to vary by factory. Indeed, as more factories began production, the amount of variation increased.

Disclaimer: The following observations have been made based on my collection. I welcome any information and will not hesitate to make revisions as needed.

OK Factory
There are two different sizes of text font.
They generally feel thin & malleable.

P Factory
The vinyl feels like OK shoes but is whiter in colour.
The text is very clear and easy to read, and larger than that in the OK shoes.
The text can include numbers. I have recorded the following:  1,2

KT Factory
The inside tends to be very smooth and clean.
The text is raised and easy to read.
Some have slightly thicker vinyl and feel less malleable.

PMI Factory
They feel like the thicker KT shoes.
The text is raised, easy to read, and quite large.
This shape is inside:

UT Factory
They are slightly bigger than the other shoes.
They are very white, with almost a bluish tinge.
The text is raised, larger, and very clear.
There is a line across the inside bottom.
The text says, Made in Taiwan and has a raised relief, embossed along with a circle with UT inside it.

The IC, SS, FD, and CY factories do not appear to have produced Mary Jane shoes.

Mary Jane’s come in two distinct sizes, one more oval than the other. Within those sizes, there are also differences in length and width depending on age and factory.

Picture of the traced soles of 6 different Mary Jane shoes. The picture shoes the different sizes of shoes that are available and which factories they are from.

All the coloured shoes are of the smaller, rounder type, like the KT shoes.

1986ish – 1989

CHINA Shoes (1987-1988ish)

Eventually, they changed or made new shoe moulds. They now said CHINA instead of HONG KONG (only a few years late), but they no longer used factory indicators. I believe these shoes came next because I have coloured shoes which straddle this situation, some with factory indicators, some with CHINA.

Picture of the inside of a white Mary Jane shoe that says "CHINA".

No Text Shoes (1988ish – 1999)

I believe the last shoes produced had nothing in the heel except possibly a mould number. They are essentially blank. Either this was the final change before Hasbro took over, or these shoes may have all been produced by Hasbro during the transitional period; it is hard to know.

Coloured Shoes

Black and brown Mary Janes appeared in 1985 on Spanish Girl and Scottish World Travelers.

In 1986 the black Mary Janes started appearing on Cornsilk Kids. It wasn’t until 1988 that other colours came out on Growing Hair kids and were sold separately. In addition, occasionally, they can be found on regular transitional kids, probably done as they were getting rid of stock.

I have recorded shoes in the following colours:

  • Black
  • Brown
  • Pink
  • Purple
  • Light purple
  • Yellow
  • Light blue
  • Teal/ Mint green
  • Bright red (not confirmed real)
  • Red (rather bright)

25th Anniversary Mary Janes (separate post)

Foreign Shoes

All the foreign factories produced Mary Jane shoes.
Tsukuda produced a lot of Mary Jane’s shoes, many in colour. It’s not unusual to find a Tsukuda boy wearing Mary Janes. The only Tsukuda Mary Janes I have seen had no markings inside.
For information on Jesmar Mary Janes jump to Shoes: Jesmar Shoes

What outfits did they come with?

Shoes: Regular ‘lace ups’ Pt 2

Which outfits came with regular ‘high top’ shoes, shoes without factories, and more. Part 2

Other relevant posts: Regular Lace-Up Shoes Pt 1, CPK Shoes: An Overview and Links, Lacing CPK Shoes

Regular ‘lace-up’ shoes appear to come in a variety of sizes as well. Some are longer and narrower, while others are shorter and wider. Some are just smaller, period.

1986ish – 1989

CHINA Text Shoes (1987-1988ish)

Eventually, they changed or made new shoe moulds. They now said CHINA instead of HONG KONG (only a few years late), but they no longer used factory indicators. I believe these shoes came next because I have coloured shoes which straddle this situation, some with factory indicators, some with CHINA.

No Text Shoes (1985ish – 1999) (Dates unsure)

I believe the last shoes produced had nothing in the heel except possibly a mould number. They are essentially blank. Either this was the final change before Hasbro took over, or these shoes may have all been produced by Hasbro during the transitional period; it is hard to know.

UPDATE
I’ve been provided evidence of these ‘number only shoes’ on a 1985 MIB SS preemie. This would seem to indicate that at least this factory started using them earlier than I thought. (Messanger, Jana Smith, May 2022) If you have more evidence, I would like to see it.

Coloured Shoes

Coloured versions of lace-ups started appearing in 1988 on Toddlers and Transitional kids. It could be that they were all produced by Hasbro, not Coleco, as they continued to be sold on Hasbro Preschoolers after 1989. For foreign Tsukuda factory also produced coloured lace-ups

I have recorded Coleco-coloured lace-up shoes in the following colours:

  • Pink
  • Vibrant Pink
  • Red
  • Purple
  • Blue
  • Baby blue (maybe mint green?)

25th Anniversary Lace-ups (separate post)

Jesmar Shoes

What outfits did they come with?

Shoes: Regular ‘lace up’ Pt. 1

What to know about regular ‘high top’ cabbage patch shoes, part 1.

Other Relevant Posts: CPK Shoe Summary, Lacing CPK Shoes

Regular lace-up shoes were manufactured by Coleco throughout the entirety of their production. However, the characteristics of the shoes varied by factory and over time.

The information in this post is chronological. If you don’t ‘recognize’ your shoes, keep going.

Hong Kong Shoes

For a definition of ‘Hong Kong Kids’, jump to the Glossary.

In the beginning, when production took place in Hong Kong [HK], the shoes had a very distinctive look.

In general, they have a number of these features but do not need to have them all.

  • They have a thicker feel to the vinyl. In some cases, the vinyl did not mould well, and they have a runny look to the inside.
  • They have textured bottoms.
  • Not all have HK shoes have black text in the heel, but if it is black, it’s a HK shoe.
  • They tend to look less ‘finished’ than other shoes. The edges look more like they’ve been cut out, or the vinyl around the edges has been trimmed.
  • In some cases, the tongue has not been cut out and is still attached.
Picture with a Hong Kong shoes comparing it to a regular shoes . Both are P factory.
Hong Kong P shoe versus later P shoe. Compare the thickness and edges of the vinyl.
OK  Some have black text. I have found some made with a very hard, almost grey vinyl. The bottom edge can be more rounded than in other factories.
PThe text runs vertical, not horizontal, in the heel. I have not found any P with black text.  
KTIn general, KT shoes have more have black text. There are two versions, one with a font smaller than the other. 

For more information on Jesmar Hong Kong shoes visit HERE

Post HK Shoes – 1986ish shoes

After the ‘experimental’ Hong Kong period, the shoes became more uniform but still had many characteristics that varied by factory. It can be very difficult to ‘match’ shoes. You THINK they look like they should match, but when you put them side by side, they are nothing alike! They aren’t the same shape, colour, texture, etc.

Most of the shoes have the factory indicator and the words HONG KONG stamped on the inside by the heel, on the bottom. The factory indicator can be inside a circle or not.

After production moved to China, the shoes became more uniform in appearance but continued to vary by factory. Indeed, as more factories began production, the amount of variation increased.

Disclaimer: The following observations have been made based on my collection. I welcome any information and will not hesitate to make revisions as needed.

OK Factory
The vinyl feels rather flimsy and thin.
The bottoms are flat.
The text is either raised and clear or very blurry.
The text comes in two sizes, the larger being closer to the heel.

P Factory
The stitching decoration is in higher relief than the OK shoes, standing out prominently.
The text is in relief and very clear to read. The text can include numbers. I have recorded the following: 4, 3, 2, 1, 6, 7 They can develop pox.

KT Factory
They look like a regular white P except: They still have a textured bottom.
The vinyl is slightly thicker and continues to have a slight ‘cut’ or ‘trimmed’ look to it, especially the tongue.
The text is raised and clear.

IC Factory
They have very prominent relief stitching decoration, and the vinyl feels more like Jesmar vinyl. The text is embossed and very clear.
A second type looks like the other but has thicker vinyl, which creates a more structured feel. The laces are a nicer, finer, whiter string.
The text can include numbers. I have recorded the following: 5, 2

PMI Factory
They look and feel like OK shoes.
The text says, HONG KONG PMI, in two lines.
A line (like that below) was created by the mould and is visible in the heel. They can develop pox.

UT Factory
The vinyl is firmer but not rigid, very white, and very smooth (almost glossy).
The stitching decoration is in VERY high relief, and it looks like stitches rather than dots.
There is a line, in a U shape, around the heel section of the shoe, on the back, not the bottom.
It was likely left by the moulding process. There is a pronounced sole ridge.
The text says, Made in Taiwan and has a raised relief, embossed along with a circle with UT inside it.
The text can include numbers. I have recorded the following: 1, 4

SS Factory
There are two styles.
The first feels and looks like an OK shoe but is slightly smaller sometimes. They are softer and more malleable.
The second looks more like a P and has high relief decoration.
There are no words, just the factory identifier, either in a circle or not.
There may be numbers located beside the letters. I have recorded: 1,2

The FD and CY factories do not appear to have produced lace-up shoes.

Continue to Part 2

CPK Shoes: An Overview and Links

Are these shoes CPK? What kids did they come on? Which shoes go with which outfit? Some answers to your CPK shoe questions . . . with more to come!

To find out more about a specific kind of footwear, click on the links included throughout.

Table of Contents

Factory labels on shoes
Shoe Type by Outfit (Summary List Here)
Exceptions
Cleaning Shoes
25th Anniversary Shoes (Play Along)
Aftermarket and Fakes
Jesmar Shoes

Edit: Lacing CPK Shoes

Factory labels on shoes

Almost all Coleco shoes produced between 1983 and 1986ish were labeled with the factory of manufacture inside by the heel. These shoes also said, Hong Kong, even after they were no longer manufactured there. It’s thought that they chose not to remake the molds. Specialty outfit shoes like clown shoes and cowboy boots are also factory marked.

Later, sometime around 1986 or 1987, they stopped putting the factory and HONG KONG inside the shoes. Instead, some say CHINA, some have just a number, and some are entirely blank. I believe that they showed up in that order but have no proof of it, except that the coloured toddler shoes have CHINA in them and the only coloured Mary Janes I’ve seen have nothing in them.

The numbers that can be found in the shoes are a mystery. I believe they are a mould number but again, I have no proof. A ‘pair’ of shoes do not need to have the same number.

.Shoe Type by Outfit

Cabbage patch kids came with various types and colours of footwear. The type of shoes that an outfit came with changed as time passed.

In 1983 and 1984 there were only four options. They were worn by regular kids and preemies. For more details on each type of shoe click on the links below.

  1. Regular ‘lace up’ shoes Part 1 & Part 2
  2. Mary Jane Shoes
  3. Sneakers
  4. knit booties

Information on which shoes went with which outfits in the 1983 Regular kids outfits, or the 1984 Preemie outfits are available on their individual posts.

Special Note: During the first few months of production, the kids manufactured in Hong Kong came out with shoes like those described above, but which had slightly different characteristics (at least long-time collectors think so). For details on how to identify Hong Kong Kid shoes go to each of the shoe types using the links near the top of this post. . Click here for a definition of Triple and Double Hong Kong Kids.

Starting in 1985, other footwear options became available, and three of the original four options began showing up in a rainbow of colours. The new options included:

Type of ShoeOutfits they belong with 
Ballet FlatsSome Cornsilk Series 2: Wacky and Layered
Some 500s series outfit
Some 800-815 series Regular kid outfits
Pointed FlatsHasbro Kissing Kids
Some 800-815 series outfits
BootsSome Cornsilk Series 2: Wacky and Layered
Some poseable kid outfits (transitional)
 
Chunky SneakersDesigner Line Kids 
Chunky Toddler SneakersSome toddlers; transitional and later Hasbro toddlers
Saddle ShoesSome regular kid transitional outfits (800s)
May have come on some later Designer Line Kids.
Transitional Poseable Kids (specifically the Cheerleader outfit)
 
WeeboksBlue Saddle Shoe Version – Coleco
Generally came hanging on the arm of Poseable kids. Some were wearing them.

White Toddler Version – Coleco
Generally, came as a second pair of shoes hanging off the kid’s arm. Some were wearing them.
 
SandalsSplashin’ Kids 
Slippers (matching)BBB Outfits, toddler outfits, Splashin’ Kid outfits, 25th Anniversary Preemies (only came in white) 

Most series did not come with only one type of footwear.
For example, the second series of Cornsilk outfits (Jump to Cornsilk Series 2: Wacky and Layered Pt. 1) came with the following:

  • #321  – Boots
  • #322 – Boots, almost all white
  • #323 – Boots
  • #324 – Boots
  • #325 – Ballet Flats
  • #326 – Boots

#327 – Ballet Flats
#328 – Boots
#329 – Ballet Flats
#330 – Ballet Flats
#331 – outfit unidentified
#332 – White Boots
#333 – Boots

Some outfits came with shoes that were unique to that outfit.

  • Talker Outfits
  • World Travelers (China, Holland, Russia, Spanish Boy)
  • Western Wear – brown boots
  • Astronauts – a sort of bootie
  • Circus Kids – clown shoes
  • Ringmaster – black boots
  • 600s PJ Series (slippers and booties)

Most of the early packaged outfits came with shoes, as did many of the packaged outfits that came with unique shoes (e.g., Western Wear). However, many packaged outfits, especially those sold after 1985, did not come with shoes included. Starting in 1985, shoes become available separately packaged with socks and other accessories. This continued until 1989.

.Exceptions (this is Coleco after all)

Like with other outfits, during transitional periods or when they were trying to get rid of excess product, occasionally you can find a MIB doll with the ‘wrong’ footwear. As long as the footwear was in production before the doll was issued, it could be a possible combination.

I have even recorded one example of a transitional regular kid wearing Hasbro Kissin’ Kid shoes!

Cleaning shoes

I clean shoes with a toothbrush and a bar of Sunlight Soap. Sticky shoes are cleaned with Magic Eraser or Bar Keeper’s Friend.

Marks made from markers, pens, and other such things that do not come out with regular cleaning can be treated with zit cream, just like a doll’s head.

Early shoes were made of the same type of vinyl as the doll heads. As such, they can get pox. They can be treated the same way as doll heads. (Videos about pox and treating pox are available here.)

The inside of a white regular, high top Cabbage Patch shoe in which you can see brown spots of 'pox'.

Shoes that are yellowed or discoloured can sometimes be treated by soaking in Polident (water-soluble, not toothpaste). I’ve found it often takes multiple soakings and doesn’t always work perfectly.

25th Anniversary Shoes

The 25th Anniversary kids came with regular shoes, Mary Jane’s, and sneakers. They are easy to distinguish as they have the Cabbage Patch logo and 1893-2008 on the bottom. The preemies came with these shoes or white slippers/booties with a white bow.

Picture of a pair of 25th Anniversary high top Cabbage Patch shoes. One shows the side and top, and the other is up on end, showing the bottom of the shoe.

.Aftermarket and Fake Shoes

There are MANY types of aftermarket CPK shoes. To learn more, jump here: Aftermarket Shoes.

Jesmar Shoes

All of the foreign factories produced CPK shoes. I do not have enough information to discuss most of them. For information on Jesmar shoes, visit Shoes: Jesmar Shoes

1983 Series – The 1st CPK Clothes (and link list)

The outfits that started it all.

Shortcut to 1983 Individual Outfit Links list

When Cabbage Patch Kids came out in 1983, each was wearing one of 18 outfits. These outfits came in a variety of colours and patterns, but there were only 18 to choose from.  (Ref #4, Vol. 3 Issue 9/10/11, p. 6)

The 1983 series of outfits worn but a group of kids who are sitting on stairs, allowing the outfits to be visible.
The 1983 Series outfits.

A 1983 catalogue that appeared to have prototype outfits in it named each outfit. However, over time collectors have created new names that better describe the outfit, allowing for easier identification. For example, the outfit below was originally called the Snuggle Suit but is generally called a Bubble Romper by collectors. (Ref #4, Vol. 3 Issue 9/10/11, p. 6)

Picture of a 'bubble romper' outfit. It consists of a yellow knitted sweater that ties closed at the neck, a white cotton romper with pink rose buds underneath, and yellow knitted booties.

Primary Factory.

As explained in an earlier post ( What are Clothing Codes?), each outfit came with a code that consists of a letter and a number. The numbers represent the outfit type, and the letters represent a specific fabric pattern or colour combination. With this series, certain letters seem to have been produced primarily by certain factories. I call these the Primary Factory for each letter. For example, the KT factory produced the letters A and B for all 18 outfits, I think. Here are the primary factories, as proposed, at this point:

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However, outfits were often produced by multiple factories, not just the Primary Factory. For example, I know that outfit 7A was produced by primary factory KT, and also by the LF, P, and OK factories. Below, we know that 2C was produced by two factories. Can you figure out which ones?

Graphic showing the code and factory outfits I have recorded for the sleeper outfit, as an example of what the record looks like.
Sample layout showing which ‘versions’ of the outfit that I have recorded. Make sure your outfit matches both code and factory. If it doesn’t, I likely need to record it.
ANSWER: 2C is produced by both the OK and KT factories. It may be produced by more, but I am unaware of them at this time.

In addition, not every letter was produced for every outfit. For example, the Sleeper (#2) only goes to letter K. Letters L to R (CC and SS primary factories) were only used for packaged outfits, and apparently, the Sleeper was not sold separately. Also, it was not manufactured by the PMI factory because the factory began production after they stopped making the Sleepers.

Factory Variation

The outfits produced by primary factory SS (P, Q, and R) are often close copies of earlier letters, making them difficult to identify. For example, if I had the red and white check Swing Dress (#1) recorded, you might think you didn’t need to check the one that you have. Unfortunately, I have the 1G (factory P) version, and yours is the 1Q (SS factory) version of the outfit, which I need to record. Consequently, checking to see if I have something recorded based on the code and factory is superior to using a description of the outfit.

A graphic showing how the SS factory outfits match previous letter outfits, using coloured spreadsheet lines.
Example: SS factory outfits matched with previous letter outfits.

We need to record all of the factories that made each outfit, as there are often differences between them. These differences can then be used to identify an outfit by factory, which may help to identify the possible factory of the kid wearing it or let you know if you need it for a specific kid. These differences can include but are not limited to, differences in:

  • fabric colour/pattern
  • small changes in the structure of the outfit
  • fabric type
  • silk tag placement
  • stitching pattern
  • thread colour
  • buttons
  • lace/edging material
  • size

Below is 1Q, as made by three different factories. Can you spot the differences?

Picture of three red and white gingham swing dresses. One each from the WW, WS and SS factories. They all look slightly different.
Difference: outfit structure, tie fabrics, red colours, size, lace pattern, elastic at sleeves, type of silk label

Potential Problems

Finally, just to make things difficult, some clothing tags, primarily those from the P and PMI factories, came with the codes on stickers that can wash off. Of the two, P factory tags like those below, are the most difficult to recognize as they do not actually have a P on them. However, even without code information, knowing which factory an outfit is from is a step in the right direction. (Jump to: What are Clothing Tag Codes)

Shoes.

As for shoes, they were specific to the outfit. In general, each outfit came with certain shoes, but there were only four options: Sneakers, Mary Jane’s, lace-up shoes (sometimes called lace-ups or high tops), and knit booties. Occasionally, as this is Coleco and they don’t stick to their own rules, kids will come with ‘unusual shoes’ for an outfit. For example, sometimes you will find dolls in the Bubble Romper with regular lace-up shoes.

Shoes that came with these outfits are labelled with the factory inside, about 1″ from the heel. They generally say ‘HONG KONG’ but were most likely produced in China, unless they came on an early 1983 doll. Like with the clothing, the shoe factory should match the dolls factory. If the doll is KT, the shoes should be KT.
For more details, jump to: Shoes – An overview and reference links

Casual Wear Line – Packaged Outfits

This is the only other line of clothing that came out in 1983 and all of these outfits came packaged. They did not come on boxed kids. For more information jump to Casual Wear Line (1983).

Outfit Summary Shortcuts

Below are shortcuts to information about each of the 1983 series outfits. This information includes the versions s that I already have recorded and those I am still looking for information on. Each outfit will open in a new tab, allowing for easier navigation while you work.
I would appreciate any help you can provide and accept tag/code information at any time.

For information on taking clothing tag pictures in order to assist with the research project, jump to: Taking Clothing Tag Pics

undefined #20 Sailor Suit

#19 There Isn’t One!

undefined #18 Striped Jogging Suit

undefined #17 Heart Dress

undefined #16 Denim Romper

undefined #15 Bib Dress

undefined #14 Pinafore Dress

undefined #13 Square Yoke Dress

undefined #12 Ruffled Overalls

undefined #11 Ducky Dress

undefined #10 Windbreaker Outfit

undefined #9 Bubble Romper

undefined #8 31 Tracksuit

undefined #7 Elephant Romper

undefined #6 Kitty Jogging Suit

undefined #5 Corduroy Suit

undefined #4 Frilly A-line Dress

undefined #3 Shoulder-Tie Dress

undefined #2 Sleeper

undefined #1 Swing Dress