I’m such an 80’s baby . . .

I hope you enjoy this as much as my friend and I did. I’m such an 80’s baby.

I just can’t resist! Look what I found on a ‘fakie’ cabbie the other day.

I know it’s not CPK, but as an 80’s baby, I just had to pass on the fun.

White Romper Room baby doll diaper with a bee and a hot air balloon that says "Romper Room" on it in a pattern all over.
White Romper Room baby doll diaper with a bee and a hot air balloon that says "Romper Room" on it in a pattern all over.
Tag from a Romper Room doll diaper with a blue bee on it.

If you aren’t familiar with Romper Room, you can learn more than you ever wanted to know here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romper_Room and https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0190196/

Who remembers the magic mirror? A North American classic.

Toddler Outfits, 880-890s

The remainder of the 800s series toddler outfits that came out in 1988. I can only find a few, do you have one I don’t have recorded?

Toddler Outfits Summary Post
Toddler Outfits 870s Series

These outfits are all copyrighted from 1987 but were sold in 1988, as indicated by the 8- in the clothing code. (For more information about these codes, visit: Part 2: The Code Addition)

It appears that these outfits were all produced while Coleco HQ was located in Amsterdam, NY, with production stopping before they moved their headquarters to Gloversville, NY, in 198

I’ve recorded two outfits in the 880s and four outfits in the 890s. There may be more outfits on either end that are unidentified. As with the 870s series, the first outfit, outfit #888, came only on boys. (The girl’s version is outfit #119. It is structured differently and doesn’t have the stars.)

I have no letter C recorded for any of these outfits and no more than four options for any outfit. This leads me to theorize that there are only four versions of each outfit: A, B, D, and E. I have no idea why they skipped C. I theorize that the outfit planned for this letter wasn’t approved.

These outfits came with regular white lace-up shoes.

Version Information

My goal is to find every version of every outfit that was produced. Below is a record of each version of this outfit that I have. To understand clothing codes, factories, and variations, please refer to these posts: 1st Blog – Why do this project?, What are Clothing Tag Codes?, Factories and Companies

If you have an outfit that is not recorded here or does not match my information, (e.g. You have a 501D OK that is pink, not yellow.) I would like to hear from you. Information is best sent in the form of pictures. For details, visit Taking Clothing Tag Pics.

Other Information

Although the outfits look like they may have multiple pieces (e.g. a shirt and overalls), they are actually all one piece.

Outfit #873 looks very similar to toddler outfit #892, except the ruffle goes all the way across.

Outfit 873: white body suit with  geometric shapes on it, a blue waist ruffle and blue sleeves. The neck has purple trim.

Toddler Outfits, The 870s

The first set of outfits that came on ‘The Kid in the Middle’, Toddlers!

Toddler Outfits Summary Post
Toddler Outfits, 880s – 890s

These outfits are all copyrighted from 1987 but were sold in 1988, as indicated by the 8- in the clothing code. (For more information about these codes, visit: Part 2: The Code Addition)

It appears that these outfits were all produced while Coleco HQ was located in Amsterdam, NY, with production stopping before they moved their headquarters to Gloversville, NY, in 1989.

There are at least six outfits in this series, but there may be more after #875 that are unidentified. Outfit #870 came only on boys, and the girl’s version is outfit #874. There may be as many as ten different versions of each outfit (A – K). This means I need a lot more information!

These outfits came with regular white lace-up shoes.

Version Information

My goal is to find every version of every outfit that was produced. Below is a record of each version of this outfit that I have. To understand clothing codes, factories, and variations, please refer to these posts: 1st Blog – Why do this project?, What are Clothing Tag Codes?, Factories and Companies

If you have an outfit that is not recorded here or does not match my information, (e.g. You have a 501D OK that is pink, not yellow.) I would like to hear from you. Information is best sent in the form of pictures. For details, visit Taking Clothing Tag Pics.

Other Information

Do not get outfit #875 with dinosaur pattern fabric confused with the Dino Overalls for regular-sized kids (#807). The latter is very HTF and very sought after. The toddler outfits, not so much.

Outfit 807, Dino overalls, in red.

Although the outfits look like they may have multiple pieces (e.g. a shirt and overalls), they are actually all one piece.

Outfit #873 looks very similar to toddler outfit #892, except the ruffle goes all the way across.

Outfit 892D. It has dark pink sleeves and ruffles, but the body is light pink with ice cream cones.

Toddler Outfits – An Overview

Toddlers, the kid in the middle, may have come out late in the 1980’s but still had some wonderful outfits. Learn about them and how they transitioned into Hasbro Preschool Kids.

Clothing Series Quick Links

870s: 1988 Toddler Outfits Pt. 1
880s – 890s: 1988 Toddler Outfits Pt. 2
135 – 139: Coleco Transitional Toddler Outfits (Future Post)
116 – 120: Hasbro Transitional Toddler Outfits (Future Post)
Packaged Splash’n See Surprise outfits (Hasbro)

“It’s been almost like 1983 revisited, and if you don’t believe it, one collector actually witnessed people fighting over toddlers!”

(Ref #4, 12/88, Vol.3 Issue 4, p. 1)

The popular 13” kid in the middle came out in 1988 and sold until 1990 when Hasbro changed the name to Preschooler for 1991. (Ref #2, p. 98) They then sold until 1992. (Ref #1, p. 35) This means there are three versions of Toddler dolls:

Coleco Toddlers only used certain head moulds, and #4 was only used for a short time. All #4 Toddlers appear to have come with the BBB pacifier. (Visit CPK Pacifiers for details). (Ref #3, p. 167) Toddlers came with new hairstyles, and new hair/eye combinations (Ref #2, p. 98). Hasbro Preschool Kids came with even more new head moulds and hair/eye/freckle combinations. (Ref #1, p. 35)

‘Transitional Period’ Toddlers can be wacky combinations of Coleco and Hasbro parts, clothing, and accessories.

Clothing Overview

870s -890s Series (1)

The first Toddlers produced in 1988 were entirely made by Coleco and wore outfits numbered in the 870s – 890s. They were all made in Amsterdam, NY.

Note: All the Coleco Toddler outfits were produced by the OK factory, one of the few factories still in production at this time. Therefore, there are no factory differences to note.

130s Series (2)

The 130s series was designed in 1987 along with the 800s series but wasn’t sold on kids until 1989. Most of these outfits were produced for Coleco in Amsterdam, NY although a few were produced by Coleco in Gloversville, NY. So far, the Gloversville outfits appear to be later letters; F and after. They were likely produced in early 1989 for a short time, so there won’t be many of them. Gloversville outfits will always be newer than Amsterdam outfits. For more information on how this works, visit: Tag Codes and locations: 1987-9 and Transitional Period – A Summary.

Teens Series (3)

The series, 116 – 120, is from the Transitional Period and was designed and sold in 1989 by Coleco or Hasbro (Pawtucket, RI). For more details about these outfits and the time period when they were sold, visit Transitional Period- A Summary.

Red and white overall romper with attached blouse. The white fabric has multi-coloured stars on it.
Sample: 9-119C, Courtesy of Jodi’s Punki Patch

Shoes

Coleco Toddlers came with regular white lace-up shoes.  Then, as Coleco transitioned into Hasbro, they started to come with Chunky Toddler sneakers and or coloured lace-ups. I’m not sure if these shoes showed up simultaneously or if there was a specific period for each. Eventually, Preschoolers only came with coloured lace-up shoes (unless the outfit matched with white shoes.

Packaged Outfits

Just like all the Coleco material that wasn’t sold by the late 1980s, Toddler outfits ended up in packages to be sold separately from the dolls. At first, the packages said Coleco on them. Later, even though they’re sometimes still Coleco outfits, the packaging says Hasbro. Eventually, they were Hasbro outfits, like those in the 116-119 series. I believe that last series was never out on kids, it only came packaged.

Preschool Kid Outfits

In my opinion, Hasbro Preschool Kid outfits are generally of lower quality, as they were produced using thinner fabrics and clowny graphics. They don’t have the same detail and care that Coleco-manufactured outfits have. These outfits did not come packaged.

Preschooler outfits can be easily identified because they come in six different themes: time, numbers, colours, alphabet, shapes, and animals. All preschooler outfits appear to come with matching coloured lace-up shoes. (Ref #1, p. 35)

Splash’n See Surprise Outfits

Visit HERE to read about these outfits.

Purple and yellow packaged outfit from the Splash'n See Surprise like.
Courtesy of Jodi’s Punki Patch.

New Video – Repairing body holes

This is how I repair a hole in the fabric of a Cabbage Patch Kid. Hope it helps in some way.

I’ve posted a new video on how I repair holes in the body fabric. The video itself is a bit rough as it was done rather quickly but I believe the information is all there. The link is also available in the right side menu under “Hilary’s How-to Videos”.

Please keep in mind I am NOT an expert in this stuff. This is just how I do it. You do what works for you.

Identifying the factory of Jeans for the Windbreaker Outfit (#10)

You’ve got 4 pairs of CPK jeans that you just washed. They’re all slightly different. Which ones goes with this outfit?? Maybe this will help.

Outfit #10 – Windbreaker Outfit
Identifying Outfit #10 Windbreakers by factory
Identifying Windbreaker Outfit (#10) shirts

These pants are the bane of my A-type personality. It’s VERY difficult to differentiate one pair of jeans from the other. Jeans are never tagged. Some of the factory differences are VERY subtle. It’s also hard to find correct information as you have to get it from a MIB kid to know the jeans are correct. Jeans can be switched out so easily and it’s done frequently.

As a consequence, this section is rather sparse. Here’s what I know.

OK Factory Jeans Characteristics

  • Tend to be shorter than other pants but not always
  • Enclosed waist elastic
  • Somewhat sloppy sewing

P Factory Jeans Characteristics

  • Tend to be longer than OK pants
  • Exposed elastic
  • Neatly sewed, straight lines

PMI Factory Jeans Characteristics

  • Very similar to P factory jeans

Foreign Jeans

Jesmar Jeans Characteristics

  • Material is thinner cotton, not really jean material
  • No pockets, CPK label, or sewing on the back of the pants
  • Elastic is exposed and thin (not as wide as Coleco elastic)

Lily Ledy Jeans Characteristics

I’ve never actually seen these. I just have pictures.

Alert: When cleaning CPK jeans, soak them separately from all other fabrics as the dye runs extensively.

Identifying Windbreaker Outfit (#10) shirts

Why know how to identify the factory of an outfit #10 shirt, after all, they’re tagged! But, what if you can’t see the tag in the picture? What if it’s been cut off?

Outfit #10 – Windbreaker Outfit
Identifying Outfit #10 Windbreakers by factory
Identifying jeans by factory

There isn’t much information here as I have observed very few factory differences in the shirts.

The striped shirts from the Windbreaker Outfit (#10) appear to come in two fabrics.

Version 1: A thin cotton t-shirt material. Known factories: OK
Version 2: A thicker synthetic material. Known factories: P, PMI, LF, IJ, WW

In general, Version 2 tends to be larger (physically) than Version 1.

Foreign Shirts

I don’t know much about the shirts that come with the foreign outfits except for Jesmar outfits.

Jesmar shirts are sometimes solidly coloured but are generally striped. However, the colours are not always ways and [insert colour here]. I also have one shirt recorded that’s white with small polka dots. They are often a very thin fabric, are badly sewn with very thin hems, and have unfinished bottom hems. Some also have typical Jesmar Velcro.

Other Outfits

The shirt for the 25th Anniversary Windbreaker outfit likely doesn’t have a tag in it. It will be purple and white. However, I can’t confirm this as I’ve never actually seen it myself. This is the only girl’s 25th Anniversary outfit I don’t own.

The shirt for outfit #100 is blue and white striped and the most obvious difference from outfit #10 shirt is the red CPK logo on the chest.

Blue and white striped windbreaker outfit shirt from outfit #100. It is blue and white striped with a red Cabbage Patch Kids logo on the chest.

Identifying Outfit #10 Windbreakers by factory

What jacket goes with which shirt in the CPK Windbreaker outfit #10? Which factory made which jacket? Find out!

Outfit #10 – Windbreaker Outfit
Identifying striped windbreaker shirts by factory
Identifying windbreaker outfit jeans by factory

The majority of CPK windbreaker jackets from outfit #10 aren’t tagged. If the jacket gets separated from the original outfit, it can be difficult to tell which shirt/jeans go with it. The shirts are tagged. So, if you can figure out the jacket’s factory, you can match it to the right shirt.

You can use the following characteristics to help determine which factory made a jacket.

Keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive. It is only based on what I can confirm as of publication. I always appreciate getting new or conflicting information.

Hem Elastic

There are two types of hems: exposed elastic and enclosed elastic.

Exposed elastic is visible and is attached using two lines of sewing. Known factories: OK, IJ

Enclosed elastic isn’t visible. It is enclosed in jacket fabric. It is a large strip of elastic, which is only sewn into the jacket at either end. Known factories: P, PMI, KT, LF

Zippers

All Coleco zippers are plastic with a metal pull, and most have KKK on the zipper pull. I have found VKK on some P factory zippers, but not all. If you have another zipper on your jacket, it is likely from a foreign factory (See below) or is aftermarket

CPK Logo

The logo seems to vary the most. There are two basic versions. One sits at almost 90 degrees from the zipper and bottom hem. The other is at more of an angle/curve.

The logos also come in varying sizes and shades of green. In some cases, they just look a bit different. Here are the logos that I have identified so far.

Foreign outfits

Jesmar: The logo is different. It has a shadow outline and is smaller than the OK one. It is applied quite far from the zipper. These jackets tend to be very thin fabric. The zipper pull is a different shape.

Lily Ledy: These jackets seem to come with a zipper or button closure or no closure system at all. For jackets with a zipper, the pull is very distinctive in shape.

Triang Pedigree: These jackets have a wide white zipper but the pull itself is silver metal.

Tsukuda: According to my records, Tsukuda jackets close with velcro. I would like to confirm this.

Special thanks to Andrea’s Cabbie-kids for some of the previous pictures and information.

Other Information

> In the only two examples of KT windbreaker outfits that I have, the tag is in the jacket, not the shirt. So, if you get a shirt without a tag, it must be KT.

> One 25th Anniversary outfit was the windbreaker outfit. It’s purple. Here is a comparison of the PA windbreaker versus a Coleco OK jacket.

> Outfit #100 is a windbreaker outfit. The most obvious and unmistakable difference in the jacket is the lack of a logo. The outfit tag is in the jacket, not the shirt.

Red CPK windbreaker jacket from the 100 outfit. Zipper is undone.